Thursday, 16 March 2017

Play-Test Fun



























Hopefully there will be a bit of good news coming soon for fans of 'Warriors of Athena'.

Tuesday, 14 March 2017

Kornovik, Barbarian Outcast

Frostgrave just got a new 'coolest' minaiture...



























Last week I received an advance-casting of the newest Frostgrave miniature, and it is, by far, the largest model in the range. It is hoped that a limited number of these will be available for purchase at Salute, before the model goes on regular release later in the year. I don't have any details on pricing yet.

The miniature is cast in resin and came in about a dozen pieces, but thanks to the well thought-out design, all of the pieces fit together perfectly with no trouble at all. The model comes with a scenic base, but I prefer my minis on round bases.

It's actually a fun little story how this miniature came to be. Back before I had written the first word of Forgotten Pacts, I had to turn in an 'artwork brief' for the cover. I knew I wanted barbarians looking down on part of the city, but then, for reasons I can't remember, I decided to have one of them riding a giant woolly rhinoceros. In retrospect, why would I not want a woolly rhinoceros.

Dmitry Burmak did his usual amazing job and took my vague brief and delivered another great cover, including a barbarian chief riding a super cool rhino. When the cover went live, it prompted a lot of comments and excitement that the supplement would include rules for mounted soldiers. I didn't want to disappoint people, but I had already decided that I was not going to include rules for mounts - partly because I don't think they generally belong in the Frozen City, but also because I haven't yet found a way to make such rules work (yet).

Instead, I decided I would work the guy on the cover into the book as a special character, and thus, Kornovik, the Barbarian Outcast was born. And there, I thought the matter would rest.

Then Nick Eyre over at North Star starts wondering if Kornovik should have his own miniature. Phil Smith at Osprey thinks he should. Nick spoke to Giorgio Bassani, who sculpted all of the Frostgrave barbarians for Forgotten Pacts. Giorgio said he would like to give it a try, but that he'd like to CAD sculpt it (for us Luddites, that basically means sculpt it on a computer). Since all of the previous figures in the range had been traditionally sculpted, no one was quite sure about this...

However, Giorgio went ahead and started, and it became clear, pretty early, that he both he and the computer program were up to the challenge. He had to make a few changes from the guy depicted on the cover. For one thing, he had to give him a bow, since I'd given Kornovik one in the rules. He also put him in a more battle-ready stance.

Now, I'm lucky enough to have one of the first Kornovik models in existence. I can't wait to get a paint brush on him!

Wednesday, 1 March 2017

Victory's Knife on Amazon

My fantasy, fiction anthology Victory's Knife is now available on Amazon as both a Kindle ebook and a print-on-demand paperback. (I have ordered a copy of the later, but have no seen it, so I can't comment on the printing quality yet).

If you are in the UK you can find it at these links:

Kindle

Print-On-Demand

For those ordering on Amazon.com you can find it here:

Kindle

Print-On-Demand


Saturday, 25 February 2017

Death Cultist and Zombie


I haven't painted many Frostgrave figures lately. Partly this is the result of my continued battles with my eyesight, partly a lack of time, and partly a bit of lingering frustration. The truth is, the last time I painted up some Frostgrave figures, I wasn't happy with the results. After awhile, I realized it all came down to basing.

When I first wrote the game, I worried about the setting. I thought it was pretty cool, but I also knew that a lot of miniature gamers hate putting snow on their figure bases. Actually, I also hated putting snow on figure bases. It's not that it doesn't look good, but that it is limiting. The figures just won't look right on a lot of table tops. You'll never want to use them if you are fighting in the desert or the jungle.

I needn't have worried. Wargamers are practical folk. People that wanted to put snow on their bases did. Others just ignored that part of the setting, and did whatever they wanted on their bases. However, when I came to paint my first Frostgrave figures, I thought I had to be 'true' to the setting, otherwise I'd feel hypocritical. The first figures I painted had full snow bases. This looked terrible, like figures standing on a pile of cotton. Next I tried to do flagstone bases similar to the bases painted by Kev Dallimore on the figures in the book. Of course, my skill with a paint brush doesn't come close to Mr. Dallimore, and again it looked pretty terrible.

So, this time, I decided I would use my regular basing technique, a mixture of fine gravel, flocking and static grass, and then just add a little touch of snow here and there. I am much, much happier with the results. Okay, my Frostgrave has a bit more grass than I imagined, but so be it. Also, I now feel that these figures could also be used outside of Frostgrave, at least in a few colder locations.

For anyone else who is suffering from 'base indecision' when it comes to Frostgrave, you have my blessing to use whatever basing technique, and look, you want.

So here are the first two figures to feature my new basing, a death cultist and a zombie. The death cultist actually features an arm (the one with the hammer) from the barbarian box. I really like this figure. He came out looking rather heroic. Even evil has its heroes, I suppose.  The zombie I'm not as keen on. I feel like I lost control of painting him at some point. Still, he's a zombie, so I won't worry about it too much!

Saturday, 18 February 2017

Victory's Knife by Joseph A. McCullough

The tales of the Endless Isles are filled with piracy, war, horror and heroism. Containing the swashbuckling adventures of Stevan the Targeteer, the wanderings of the grim gunfighter, Bowis de Lleiva, and the darkly humorous accounts of the mysterious gravedigger, Nick Bury, Victory's Knife collects the folklore of a lost world.

Written over a period of twenty years by Joseph A. McCullough, the designer of the award-winning tabletop wargame, Frostgrave, and the soon-to-be released Ghost Archipelago, this anthology brings together his most popular fantasy short stories.

* * * 

And with those words, I am launching my first, self-published ebook! Victory's Knife will be appearing on Amazon, Itunes, and all of the regular ebook places over the next week, selling for $5. However, I wanted to give my loyal blog readers a chance to get the book first and to get a little discount.

So, if you are interested in getting a copy, just send $4.00 to paypal: joe5mc2@yahoo.com and specify if you want the PDF, ePUB, or Kindlie (mobi) file. I will then email the file to you. I am doing all of this manually, so there will be a delay between when you order and when I get a chance to send you the book, but hopefully it shouldn't be long.

Victory's Knife contains 17 short stories, most of which first saw publication in various magazines and 'zines over the years, although a couple appear here for the first time. In fact, you can read the shortest piece in the book on my blog here.

I would also like to take a moment to thank my friend, Steven Meyer-Rassow who designed the cover. He took my vague explanation of what I wanted and made it beautiful!

I will, of course, be talking more about the book over the coming days, but for anyone who wants to get it now, and save a buck, here's the chance. Feel free to comment and let me know what you think!

Friday, 17 February 2017

Ring Them Bells

In parts of Spain and France, people used to leap out of cathedral bell towers with the bell cords tied around their wrists and trust to the momentum of the ringing bells to pull them back in.

How's that for an attention-grabbing first line?

I recently finished reading The Arches of the Years by Halliday Sutherland. Back in the early 1930's the book was a best-seller in Britain; now it is almost completely forgotten. Essentially it is the autobiography of the first half of Sutherland's life, and although he isn't particularly famous, he did lead an interesting and adventurous life. He grew up in the Highlands amidst a culture that freely mixed superstition with Calvinism. He went to medical school at a time when he had to capture stray cats to practice anatomy. He voyaged with a whaling ship, first practised medicine in Spain where he 'attempted' bull-fighting, he dabbled in the stock market, served on an armed merchantman in World War I, and then returned to Britain to run a mental hospital. 

The book is written in a refreshingly honest and open style, and it is loaded with interesting details (Who knew that whale bones were used to make fake feathers as far back as the fourteenth century? You didn't think those were actual feathers on knight's helmets did you?).

One note, particularly, caught my eye. While travelling in Spain, Halliday went to Seville, where he witnessed a group of bell ringers leaping out of the top of the cathedral bell tower and swinging around on the bell ropes. This bell tower was nearly 300 feet above the ground!

I must admit, I'd never heard of anything like this, and it seemed to stretch credibility a bit. I did a quick internet search, but couldn't find anything on it. Still curious, I dropped an email to an acquaintance of mine who happens to live in Seville, the talented artist who goes by the name aRu-Mor. She explained that she wasn't native to Seville and was unaware of the tradition, but that she had heard of a group of acrobatic bell-rings in a nearby city. She did a bit of asking around and discovered a couple of amazing things. The first is the video below. Okay, they don't actually leap out of the tower, but they do leap up onto the bell and lean out of the tower! (Skip to about 4:50 to see the move).

Pretty amazing, but not quite proof. However, Ru-Mor also pointed me to this Spanish blog which looks into the question. It includes these rather amazing little pieces of art that come from near the beginning of the twentieth century.



That's got me pretty well convinced. As it turns out, I once wrote a fantasy short story in which the ringing of 'Spanish Bells' played a very big roll. More on that soon...